Shepard Fairey Sues The Associated Press

Shepard Fairey’s Barack Obama campaign poster is still in the news even though people now refer to the subject as President Obama. Fairey has filed a lawsuit against The Associated Press, requesting the judge to state that he is “protected from copyright infringement claims.”Continue Reading

Stealing Images Online

Robert Genn’s latest Painter’s Keys newsletter is discussing copyright online and mentions them awful copyright notices that artists put all over their work.

“Those imprints are called “watermarks,” and while they give the copyright holder a feeling of security, they don’t deter Chinese clone shops from helping themselves. They don’t deter others, either, and it is photographers, particularly, who know all about it. Some pirates think we are living in the last days of copyright and they want to get to the New World. Using low-pixel images will certainly deter someone from making a direct giclee from your image, but no technology will stop somebody making a hand copy of anything you put out there.” Continue Reading

Art Fag City’s Cease and Desist

Those with a blog or website should be interested in the discussion over at Art Fag City where the estate of Helmut Newton has sent Paddy Johnson a cease and desist letter. She posted a nude Naomi Campbell photo by the fashion/erotic photographer Helmut Newton when she mentioned a Naomi Campbell retrospective at the upcoming Art Basel Miami in 08.Continue Reading

Artist Royalties

There has been more talk of an artists royalty scheme in Australia, where artists (or their family if they are dead) receive a small percentage each time their work is resold in the future.

The Sydney Morning Herald says “It (the government) is determined to introduce a resale royalty scheme this year giving artists a percentage of the sale price whenever their work is sold. The details have yet to be finalised but some industry bodies have called for a flat rate of 5 per cent on all sales and for the royalty to apply to all works sold for more than $500. That would mean an artist who sold a work 10 years ago for $500 could reap up to $10,000 if it was sold again for 200,000.”Continue Reading