Michael Kalish License Plates

Taking the car theme of the past few days a little further, Angela has pointed out a story about an artist that uses car number plates as a medium. The license plate art of Michael Kalish sells for between $5,000 and $150,000.

CBS News has a story and video of the artist online here. Here’s some quotes from the artist..

Michael Kalish License Plate Art

“It’s so Americana. It’s so iconic. It’s the thumbprint of the automobile. Every one is individual, and they’re so unique.” Michael Kalish

“It’s such a great dimension to a piece of art that there are 50, 100 — you know — 200 stories within a piece of art from people from all over the country, all over the world, where they’ve been. Whose car was that on? And what’s the story behind that? And then each piece tells a different story.” Michael Kalish

Also in the report by CBS, Christopher Forney of the Artworks Gallery which represents the work of Michael Kalish said this about the artist.. “In today’s age of media, it’s an important element for an artist to also be a personality and in somebody who’s actually portraying other personalities. It’s interesting and important that he is.”

About Dion

Australian artist and observer of things.. all kinds of things. I like a wide variety of art, from the weird and wonderful to the bold and beautiful.. and everything in between.

Comments

  1. Your Barbara Rush story sent me off on a different tack: automotive art. Surprise, surprise. I discovered Advanced Airbrush, Australia’s leading professional airbrush production shop. Its website has an excellent online gallery of automotive art:
    http://www.airbrush.com.au/custom.shtml
    I selected a fantasy girl sitting on a giant skull as an example. There’s also an award-winning dragon with chains that dangle over the bumper and seem real.

  2. Seeing Michael’s work always reminds me of the “Artist License” series by Greg Constantine. Greg has taken the license plate theme into a slightly different direction. For many years he has been painting acrylic on styrene “Artist License” plates.

    http://www.andrews.edu/%7Egregcons/
    ARTIST%20LICENSES/index.htm

    I’ve always thought his Delacroix would look great on the front of my car!

  3. I am soo glad that you posted this! I like the thought that each piece, being made of License Plates holds alot of memories. Memories that some may just toss because they are License Plates. To find a way to take those memories and turn them into art really fascinates me. May it be License Plates or any other type of object that holds memories and is put into art.
    :) *HUGS*

  4. They wouldn’t even think of tossing them now that they are art! That’s tooo kewl! :)
    *HUGS*

  5. Interesting this work. Has a certain multiple connection feel to it. Although the image is just of one person – the superman – the composition and number plates make odd connections. Sort of recalls to a lurking memory. Not to bad this one.
    An old American I new, died a few years back. I cleaned up his house and distributed his old belongings. He had a collection of old Number plates from the USA. Most of them are over 40 years old, some are from the 1930′s.
    I have always thought they had an interesting feel and look to them.
    Maybe down the track I could incorporate them into some art, but once you see someone else do it …….

  6. Anonymous says:

    Also in the report by CBS, Christopher Forney of the Artworks Gallery which represents the work of Michael Kalish said this about the artist.. “In today’s age of media, it’s an important element for an artist to also be a personality

    I thought the art was great. But I saw the spot on CBS Sunday this past weekend and was pretty downhearted about the gallery’s “personality” statement. In full context they said that they had never accepted an unestablished artist before (they sell Warhol, Lichtenstein, etc.) even though they are approached countless times every year. And basically what they said was that the reason they accepted this artist was because he is a former professional baseball player, hence the personality reference.

    Not that I don’t think the art is really cool. It’s just that there is a lot of really cool art out there. Wasn’t it here that someone said the way to become successful as an artist was to become successful (and hopefully famous) doing something else first, then let them know that you are also an artist? Call me crazy, but that is just a little twisted to me. Another byproduct of our celebrity obsessed society.

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