5 Lessons Grown Up Artists Could Learn From a 3 Year Old

3 year old Child Prodigy

The amazing thing about a lot of these child prodigies is their prodigious marketing and business skills. I know they’re usually compared to Monet, Picasso or Pollock, but the artists they should really be compared to are Damien Hirst and Jeff Koons. The amount of publicity these child prodigies receive in one year is more than most working artists will receive in a lifetime.Continue Reading

Painting Music – Top 10 Albums

Music to Paint to

Since discovering the iPod I now rarely listen to whole albums while I paint as I just create play lists to suit my mood. But some albums just play well all the way through so I still use them in the studio.

Here’s Ten albums that have kept me company during the completion of a painting or two..Continue Reading

Why do we Make Art?

I sometimes wonder why? What’s the point? Why make art at all?

It’s usually only after days like today, days that are physically, mentally and emotionally draining.

Everything will be alright tomorrow.

Being in the Flow or the Zone

Here’s an interesting quote from Robert Genn’s latest newsletter called “Transartistic meditation,” which is something like Transcendental Meditation.Continue Reading

Painter Riding on the Back of Photographer?

A photographer recently asked an interesting question on an old post called Painting from Photographs.

He asks..

What should a photographer do after receiving a request from a painter who wants to paint loads of his images?

- a fee per image?
- % when painter sells this painting?
- just agreement about a credit line for the photographer?Continue Reading

Being an Artist is a Privilege

Robert Genn’s latest Painter’s Keys newsletter is an interesting one. He replies to a letter from artist Tom Lockhart talking about how being an artist can be tough. Tom wrote the following to Robert..

“I work 50 to 65 hours per week, teach workshops and serve on the Board of a Local Arts Center. I judge art shows and travel to locations to paint. I earn $75,000.00 to $100,000.00 annually–too much to get a grant. I pay more than my share of taxes, expense out what the law allows and still find it difficult to make ends meet. I’m constantly paying entry fees, dues, advertising, framers, suppliers and travel expenses. I can’t understand why the public insists on buying cheap, crappy art from poorly educated artists who suffer for their craft. Yuk! There are constantly retired lawyers, doctors, architects, dentists and other professionals who decide to become painters. They put their work in galleries and sell to the unsophisticated, taking sales away from deserving, serious artists. And now with the economic bad times, it’s even harder to sell your art. What do you think about this?”Continue Reading

Paris Street Painters Lose to Cheap Chinese Paintings

Painters working on the streets of Montmartre in Paris may soon become a thing of the past with the introduction of cheap, soulless Chinese paintings done by the painters equivalent of a battery hen in a small steal cage.

Many of the 300 officially registered artists working on the streets are now competing with souvenir shops selling mass produced Chinese oil paintings for a fraction of the cost that local Paris artists can afford to sell them for.Continue Reading

Online Tips for Artists

Brian Sherwin from MyArtSpace has created a list of tips for artists looking to be seen online. Some of his tips include..

  • Answer email that you receive about your art promptly.
  • Be smart about how you list your contact info.
  • Have a website or online community profile that is devoted to your artwork.
  • Create free accounts on online art communities.
  • Maintain an active blog for your art.
  • Establish yourself on social networking sites.

Read the rest of Brian’s artist tips over his My Art Space Blog. He’s also involved with the online art galleries at My Art Space and New York Art Exchange.Continue Reading

Artists Getting Business Savvy

The Art Newspaper spoke with the British artist Keith Tyson about how artists are starting to take control of their career, rather than simply handing the reigns to the art dealer and hoping for the best. It’s a theme that comes up more and more lately.

Here’s a couple quotes from the article..
“Galleries will promise you the world in terms of production costs but it comes at the price of complete control. There‚Äôs a conflict of interest in having the people who retail your work being the same people that help you with production because they will try and own it.” Keith Tyson QuoteContinue Reading

Damien Hirst Corporation Layoffs

I told myself that I wouldn’t mention Damien Hirst for a while as he’s a bit of a news hog, but I just can’t help myself. There’s no other artist out there like him. None of my artists friends have told me that they’re laying off up to 20 employees as none of my artist friends have 20 employees to lay off.Continue Reading